Political movement

  • the mid-19th century scandinavism political movement led to the modern use of the term scandinavia.

    in the social sciences, a political movement is a social group that operates together to obtain a political goal,[1] on a local, regional, national, or international scope. political movements develop, coordinate,[2] promulgate,[3] revise,[4] amend,[5] interpret,[6] and produce materials that are intended to address the goals of the base of the movement. a social movement in the area of politics can be organized around a single issue or set of issues, or around a set of shared concerns of a social group. in a political party, a political organization seeks to influence, or control, government policy, usually by nominating their candidates and seating candidates in politics and governmental offices.[7] additionally, parties participate in electoral campaigns and educational outreach or protest actions aiming to convince citizens or governments to take action on the issues and concerns which are the focus of the movement. parties often espouse an ideology, expressed in a party program, bolstered by a written platform with specific goals, forming a [coalition] among disparate interests.

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The mid-19th century Scandinavism political movement led to the modern use of the term Scandinavia.

In the social sciences, a political movement is a social group that operates together to obtain a political goal,[1] on a local, regional, national, or international scope. Political movements develop, coordinate,[2] promulgate,[3] revise,[4] amend,[5] interpret,[6] and produce materials that are intended to address the goals of the base of the movement. A social movement in the area of politics can be organized around a single issue or set of issues, or around a set of shared concerns of a social group. In a political party, a political organization seeks to influence, or control, government policy, usually by nominating their candidates and seating candidates in politics and governmental offices.[7] Additionally, parties participate in electoral campaigns and educational outreach or protest actions aiming to convince citizens or governments to take action on the issues and concerns which are the focus of the movement. Parties often espouse an ideology, expressed in a party program, bolstered by a written platform with specific goals, forming a [coalition] among disparate interests.