Frederick Gowland Hopkins

  • sir frederick gowland hopkins

    om prs
    frederick gowland hopkins nobel.jpg
    born(1861-06-20)20 june 1861
    eastbourne, sussex, england, united kingdom
    died16 may 1947(1947-05-16) (aged 85)
    cambridge, england, united kingdom
    nationalityenglish
    educationcity of london school
    alma materking's college london
    guy's hospital
    known forvitamins, tryptophan, glutathione
    awards
    • foreign associate of the national academy of sciences (1924)[1]
    • nobel prize (1929)
    • royal medal (1918)
    • copley medal (1926)
    • albert medal (1934)
    • order of merit (1935)
    scientific career
    fieldsbiochemistry
    institutionsuniversity of cambridge
    academic advisorsthomas stevenson
    doctoral studentsjudah hirsch quastel
    malcolm dixon
    antoinette pirie
    other notable studentsj.b.s. haldane
    albert szent-györgyi[2]

    sir frederick gowland hopkins om, prs[3] (20 june 1861 – 16 may 1947) was an english biochemist who was awarded the nobel prize in physiology or medicine in 1929, with christiaan eijkman, for the discovery of vitamins, even though casimir funk, a polish biochemist, is widely credited with discovering vitamins. he also discovered the amino acid tryptophan, in 1901. he was president of the royal society from 1930 to 1935.[4]

  • education and early life
  • career and research
  • personal life
  • references
  • external links

Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins

Frederick Gowland Hopkins nobel.jpg
Born(1861-06-20)20 June 1861
Eastbourne, Sussex, England, United Kingdom
Died16 May 1947(1947-05-16) (aged 85)
Cambridge, England, United Kingdom
NationalityEnglish
EducationCity of London School
Alma materKing's College London
Guy's Hospital
Known forVitamins, tryptophan, glutathione
Awards
Scientific career
FieldsBiochemistry
InstitutionsUniversity of Cambridge
Academic advisorsThomas Stevenson
Doctoral studentsJudah Hirsch Quastel
Malcolm Dixon
Antoinette Pirie
Other notable studentsJ.B.S. Haldane
Albert Szent-Györgyi[2]

Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins OM, PRS[3] (20 June 1861 – 16 May 1947) was an English biochemist who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1929, with Christiaan Eijkman, for the discovery of vitamins, even though Casimir Funk, a Polish biochemist, is widely credited with discovering vitamins. He also discovered the amino acid tryptophan, in 1901. He was President of the Royal Society from 1930 to 1935.[4]