Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari Province

Chahar Mahaal and Bakhtiari Province

استان چهارمحال و بختیاری
Counties of Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari Province
Counties of Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari Province
Location of Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari Province in Iran
Location of Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari Province in Iran
Coordinates: 32°19′39″N 50°51′17″E / 32°19′39″N 50°51′17″E / 32.3275; 50.8546 · 13th
Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari Province Historical population
YearPop.±%
2006843,784—    
2011895,263+6.1%
2016947,763+5.9%
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Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari Province (Persian: استان چهارمحال و بختیاری‎, Ostān-e Chahār-Mahāl-o Bakhtiyārī ) is one of the 31 provinces of Iran. It lies in the southwestern part of the country. Its capital is Shahr-e Kord.

The province was classifed as part of Region 2 upon the division of the provinces into 5 regions solely for coordination and development purposes on June 22, 2014.[1]

It has an area of 16,332 square kilometers, and had a population of 895,263 in 2011.[4]

The history of the province is tied largely to that of the Bakhtiari tribe. The Bakhtiari tribe can be divided into two sub-tribes, Haft Lang and Chahar Lang, with various territorial affiliations. They are the main speakers of Lurish language. As the name of the province indicates, the other group of people in this ancient province are the Chahar Mahali. These people and the Lur speakers live side by side and share nearly similar customs. In addition, individuals have intermarried between these groups. The cities of Shahr-e Kord, Broujen, Ben, Naafch and Saman are within the Chahar Mahali area of the province. The Lur dod not generally live here. The Bakhtiari territories at times have also come under Isfahan and Khuzestan province.

The people of this province have had a subsistence economy. They have gained a reputation as excellent, if not the best, horsemen in Iran. The people of this province have practiced the Pahlevani wrestling/combat style of the traditional Zurkhane, which is practiced in all provinces. But they also have their own style of wrestling/unarmed combat as do other provinces. It is called jangi ("jang" means "war" and hence "jangi" "war-ish" or "warlike").

The people have other specific customs associated with their tribal lives. Special forms of music, dance, and clothing are noteworthy.